distracted-by-phonesThese days, almost everyone has a smart phone. Cell phones can do amazing things, much more than they could do even a few years ago. While phones were originally used for calling, texting, and perhaps to play a very basic game, smart phones can do almost anything you could imagine.

Want a device that will give you step by step directions to basically anywhere in the country? Use your phone. Did you forget to turn off your lights at home and activate your alarm system? There’s an app for that. Looking for something that will track all of your calories and workouts to make sure you are sticking to your diet? Done.

With all the things that cell phones do for us, it’s really no wonder that we spend a good chunk of our day hypnotized by them. Smart phones are a tool; a means to ends that is neither good nor bad in themselves.

However, we often get so caught up in them that we lose sight of important things in our lives. We can become less productive, or fail to nurture our relationships with those around us while our attention is focused on our screens. Our ancestors worshiped golden statues, but are we guilty of idolatry with a new object? Are we committing the 21st century sin of phone worship?

Negative Impact

Almost everywhere you turn, you can see people on their cell phones. Whether they be on dates, in church, or at the movies, people just can’t seem to pull themselves away from their phones. Unfortunately, it’s starting to take its toll. There are health conditions related directly to overuse of cell phones, and these health conditions are on the rise:

  • Texting thumb is a common form of tendinitis that comes from overusing the thumb to send text messages and browse the web from your phone.
  • More people are getting headaches related to staring at a screen for too long.
  • Neck strain is another common occurrence from so many people looking down at their phones for long periods of time.

While none of these things are life threatening and more of an annoyance than anything, it is a sign that something is wrong in our society.

Distracted driving has risen exponentially since the use of cell phones has become popular. Years ago, all distracted driving meant was that you looked away from the road for a brief second to change the radio station, or perhaps you were using one hand to eat.

phone worshipNow it has become something far more serious. People are using their cell phones while driving, which has led to the death of many. Too often are people running red lights or veering off the road because they thought the text they were sending was just too important to wait. A sense of urgency seems to be felt by most of us now; that phone call to mom needs to happen now, or you need to order your pizza on the drive home so it’s ready when you get home. While it seems convenient, it can be deadly.

Even when using a smart phone isn’t directly posing a danger to you, it steals your focus away from friends, scenery, and events. Life passes you by and you are tacitly saying that you value your time on your phone over other things. When we look back at our lives, it’s highly unlikely that anyone will wish they had spent more time staring at their phone, yet that’s how many of us act in the present.

What You Can Do About It

If you find yourself among those who can’t seem to go more than a few minutes from looking at your phone, there are a few things you can do to help. Consider putting your phone in another room so you don’t find yourself absentmindedly checking your Facebook or Snapchat. Turn your ringer to silent so you don’t feel obligated to check your phone every time you receive a text or email. Set your phone up to get fewer push notifications so that your phone doesn’t go off every time someone “likes” your photo of your cat that you posted last week. These things can help you live in the now.

Some people are forgoing cell phones and social media altogether. These people find that they enjoy life much more when they aren’t constantly tied down by a device that requires their attention 24/7. If you find yourself stressed because of your phone, you may want to consider getting rid of it. While this isn’t possible for everyone, going back to a simpler time may be just what you need to get rid of your phone addiction.

50 comments

  1. brother phillip ramey says:

    turn them off before entering any church.

    1. Keith E Nicholson says:

      I agree that your phones should be silent with very few exception’s when It comes to spending time with God say you have not brought your Bible with you and a specific piece of scripture catches your heart and you wish to save it for a later reference with friends or if you wish to record that sermon for a ailing friend or family member for when your together they can be helpful tools for sharing God with others but make sure that you have spoken with your Pastor for his approval and that it is not a distraction from God for you or any other member just as when your spending time with other let that be were your focused not on the distractions of your phone they are a great tool if used for the correct purpose and don’t become the focus of your life let God your family and friends be that Focus

    2. Patty says:

      My phone is my pocket Bible. I use it in church a lot. When they switched his different versions it’s in my phone. I would have so many Bibles to carry and it’s in a small Phone. The best thing is my Bible is always in my pocket . The Bible that would fit in my pocket would be really hard for me to read because of the size.

    3. GOD's servant says:

      Thinking about this subject today ans yes a cellphone is a man made device that takes people’s time away from living their lives. Think about it, if you’re at work and you have that urge to look at your cellphone to do whatever you are sacrificing your job right their or if people are about to eat a meal or drink something the first thing that people do is take a picture of it and post it on a social media and to my opinion that is a form of sacrifice because people put a device first instead of their body needs and ofcourse some people now a days depend on a phone to use the bible but won’t pick up their actual bible to read the text. People now a days risk alot for their cellphones and some cannot live without it, I see that as a form of worship. I am personally am doing my best not to use it a lot nor depend on it. I will consider the ways of old like THE LORD has taught in the bible. Remember we do not come to worship man made objects but we come to worship and serve THE LORD GOD only! It’s time to wake up from that slumber and sound the trumpets!!

      1. HSW says:

        I’m not clear on what your issue with reading the bible on a cell phone is. At Patty said, she would have many different versions to carry around and this way her bible is always with her. Taking a picture of a beautifully prepared meal is a way of sharing it with friends, not worshiping either the meal or the phone. Those of us who “can’t live without it” use it as a calendar, emergency contact, reading device, news outlet, document sharing device, and so much more. What is the problem with using the best tool for the job?

  2. J. Paul Lanier says:

    I think the term “phone worship” is way over the top. People do not worship their phones. A phone is a tool. Like any tool, some misuse it. That should not be generalized or stereotyped. Moreover, social media is a new way of relating to others. I object to the idea that it is somehow inappropriate. I keep in touch with my friends far more often than before social media. If you don’t like social media, don’t use it.

    1. Keith E Nicholson says:

      I think they are just using it for a reference to many people today are way to attached to their Phone I have had that talk with my kids and will be having that talk with my Grand kids that they need to be Focused on life not their phone how many people have been injured or killed because they were doing some thing with their dang phone I stopped a young woman from walking into traffic one afternoon because she was reading what was on her phone and just walked into the street I don’t think they worship their Phone but it has sadly for to many people become a distraction from life instead of simply a tool to help us stay connected I personally pull over for a phone call I don’t text and most days don’t even turn on this box till evening unless I need to look sum thing up or connect with friends on social media but I hope I didn’t offend you with my comments that was not my intent because worshiping you phone is a way to grab your attention and draw you into the topic and get your take on how we have become attached to our phone and not always in a good way May this day be a blessing to you and yours as you are a blessing to many people

    2. Dennis Loucks says:

      I agree. So long as they aren’t in use during a service they’re a great tool.

    3. Pastor CD Whitfield says:

      Greetings Brother Lanier, , , I do agree with you that the cell phone is a tool that is overly misused. I also think it is worship by many people. Anything or things that occupy more of our conscience other than our creator maybe entering into worship that thing. We are either addicted to our creator or addicted to things.

    4. Stephen Venneman says:

      I’m fairly certain they are not insinuating that people actually worship their phones.

  3. Minister Paul says:

    I agree that overuse of cell phones are close to phone worship

    1. Richard Yap says:

      I agree too. Also over working and over depending is also equally bad. Over focus on money is far more worst than the rest.

      1. Milton Currington says:

        I agree as well. In my job as a Transit operator I see my share of cell phone worshipers to the degree that it affects me and how I do my job. When your use of cell phones affect others it is a big problem.

        1. Liz says:

          Perhaps you should consider a different line of work if someone else’s use of a cell phone affects you to the point where you are unable to perform your job duties properly.

          Do screaming babies have the same impact upon you? Old people? Perhaps you should not consider yourself so entitled as to be able to dictate how, when or where someone chooses to use their cell phone.

  4. vic smyth says:

    Another suggestion is to try an eSabbath (idea plagiarized from Colin Beavan, No Impact Man) . Pick a day a week and leave your cell phone off. This can be extended to all electronic media such as laptops and TVs. You connect with people face to face, do something with your hands, experience the outdoors.

    1. HSW says:

      Easier said than done – and not practical at all for those who only have a cell phone and no land line. That would mean no one could reach them in an emergency, which most of us would find untenable. In addition, many people have jobs that require them to be available 24/7. So…a nice idea, but for a lot of people, unworkable.

    2. Mark Wynn says:

      That’s a good way to honor the Sabath day

  5. Patrick Halloran says:

    I believe that the “phone worship” or over use of phones, social media, etc is more symptomatic than problematic. We have become so obsessed with “getting liked” instead of just living the way we know we should. Does it matter if anyone “likes” your post? You like it and just thought someone else might also. We spend too much time concerned with how we are perceived and not enough time enjoying our lives the way we want them to be. I have “unfriended” many close friends just because I don’t really care what they had for breakfast and what cute pictures and videos they found on the internet while wasting countless hours there. I still consider them to be close friends, just don’t need every detail of their lives

  6. Jacqueline Melbourne-Milner says:

    Today, I went visiting. It was only half-way through my journey that I then realized that I had ventured out without my mobile phone! I had no meetings planned (it’s a Saturday), I was not expecting a call and I had already return called or texted back all who were awaiting to hear from me. I carried on with my journey in full confidence that my voicemail was on and that if I felt the need to call someone I could use a public phone (they still exist) – or, even take the time to visit them in person later on in the day. My day went very well – in fact, it was a very calm and stress-free day with no interruptions … amazing. I realize that I am still relatively new to mobile phone-free days and that it had been a long time since I went a whole day without online interaction. 1-day a week of contemplation time sounds great … perhaps on a Sunday 🙂 A wonderful week, BE Inspired!

  7. Tom Jaynes says:

    I was raised at a time where you had one phone in the house. It was usually centrally located to provide equal access from all over the home. It was also a party line. You shared your phone line with one or two neighbors. If you picked up the phone to call out and heard voices, you discreetly hung up and tried again later. If you were not home and someone called, they got no answer and knew to call you back another time. There was no such thing as an answering machine. And despite all these “inconveniences”, which we did not realize would become inconveniences, the sun still came up the next day. I am proud to say that I still treat my “smart phone” as if it was not that smart and was truly just one notch above a phone with a crank on the side. I shut it off with regularity. I change my answering device greeting to indicate that I am enjoying a day or so off the grid and to please call back another time. Just because I own a phone does not require me to jump every time it rings, sings or dings. If someone has an emergency, they need to call 911. I am neither, police, fire or ambulance. There is definitely something spiritual about disconnecting oneself from 24/7 accessibility. It is a practice I recommend to others. Stop connecting with others constantly and take some time to connect with yourself. You just might encounter a better class of people 🙂

    1. SueW says:

      If you don’t have anyone in your life that is important enough that you’d want to know if they were sick, injured, or died, that’s not spiritual. It’s sad. I only have one phone. I don’t feel compelled to answer calls from random numbers. That’s what the “convenience” of voice mail is for. But my children and my close friends know I’ll be there for them if they need me. That’s as spiritual as it gets.

      1. Tom Jaynes says:

        Point well made. However, if someone dear to me is sick or has died, I am the last one to call. I can do nothing for them at this point. If they are injured they need to seek medical attention, not call me until,that has been done. Believe me, I will get notified. My point is that we are all too often in communication with people for frivolous reasons. I once lived in an apartment building and would hear folks on the phone in the elevator saying, “I’m on the way.” I know that same person would call more en route to give an update as to their location and status. This is insane and totally unnecessary.
        Sadly though, even in an emergency, there is little I can do to help the sick, injured or dead. If my relationship with them has been strong, they know that my thoughts and prayers are always with them. I do not need to see the corpse to prove that sentiment. I do not need to be next to someone who is in a coma and breathing their last. They do not even know I am there. I can pray for all these folks from any location. When I travel, which I do frequently out of the country, I am out of touch and incapable of offering genuine assistance to anyone who is sick, injured or dying. Believe me, people I have dearly loved passed away during my absence. The sun still came up the next day.
        By the way, I recently saw a traffic advisory sign on a highway in my state that said, “Your car is not a phone booth. Just drive.” Could life advice.

        1. Paula says:

          except……..like us, we only have one car and live in the woods, so to speak. When he is not home and has the car, I have no transportation in case of heart attack or such. Makes life harder if no car and phone is off or absent. No family and really no really close neighbors. If my husband had a crash in the forest roads, went to the hospital or needed help, I have no way of knowing or geting to him. I feel blessed that I have one and it is next to me.

      2. shiningwolf9 says:

        Even Yashua, Buddha, Mahammod, Moses, Holy Men and Women of every tribe and Nation, went off by themselves, to get away from the people, family, noise, etc., in order to reconnect with the Source of life. Do not say, “If one is not readily available to family and friends, then one is not spiritual”.

        1. SueW says:

          If that’s what you think I said, then you didn’t read what I was responding to.

  8. HSW says:

    OK I get it – you’re totally focused on your needs, not theirs. That’s not the way I choose to live, but it’s your life and your choice.

    1. Tom Jaynes says:

      Now you get it.

  9. Iris says:

    Communication is God.

    (…also, not a ‘He’, despite popular opinion. If anything, Earth Chromosomes are: Female: XX + Male: XY… thus, Creator is XXXY; “once, twice, three times a Lady…” 😉 )

    There is a time and a place for phone-worship; it should never interfere with the Presence of God – aka real-time, real communication.

    Bless.

  10. Karen Bennett says:

    I can understand the importance of smartphones. I use mine ALOT for my Bible studies. But I feel if you are at dinner with family or friends put them away. If I’m visiting with my children I want them put away. Nothing can be more ruder than trying to spend quality time with the ones you love and them on their phone. I recently fell into an addiction I’m not proud of I play games on my phone and I said I never would so I have to curb my way away from this . I feel guilty about it and ask God for forgiveness. There is a lot of pro and cons with having a smartphone. Great arrival by the way.

    1. Liz says:

      WOW! you feel guilty about being “addicted” to playing games to the point of asking god for forgiveness? I can’t even fathom that!

  11. Chris says:

    I am one of the people that does not have a “smart” phone. I do have a cell, but only use about 10 minutes a month on it. I have it strictly for emergencies. I have major heart problems as well as spinal issues. I also care for a disabled parent. I have no issue turning my ringer off, but always have it on vibrate when I am in an office, church, library, etc. I won’t turn it completely off in case my mothers emergency service calls to notify me that she has pushed the “I need Help” button. I really don’t like talking on a phone at all. If I am able, I go see the people. For those that are in other states, I still use snail mail and email to contact them. So many rely on technology to do everything, I still try to rely on the people.

  12. Pastor Kelly Reed says:

    I hate the fact that I too, feel lost without a cell phone. The other day I forgot it at home. My husband was in the hospital waiting to have his broken hip repaired and I was in a hurry to get there. There was a delay in his surgery and we were waiting for a doctor to clear him for surgery. I felt so anxious without my phone, I finally told my husband I had to go home to get it. I was 20 minutes from home but I hurried and hoped I would return to his side before his surgery. When I returned to the hospital he had gone to surgery. I realized that if something went wrong in surgery, my last memory would be me telling him I selfishly had to go home to get my phone. Twenty years ago it would not have crossed my mind because I wasn’t a slave to my phone. The anxiety I felt without my phone was real. Now I keep my phone with me but turn it down and try not to pick it up every time it makes a noise. When I am home I put it in a different room so I am not enslaved to it all day. I think the idea we have to have a phone with us is a learned behavior that we all need to think about unlearning.

  13. Shade says:

    Im using my phone now to read this info..bur o do believe that cell phones have definitely gotten away from its intended use …emergency. burt wirh everything else must be uses in moderation but being human we know that will be impossible

  14. Linda Lou says:

    Phone worship: “Why does people turn into the the cell phones and internet TV every minute they can glace into the outside world? Within the fast pace of keeping up with Society and Jones of this world, some people have lost their way back to the eternal salvation rules of life.
    Turn back to the Creators of Earth!
    Open your Holy Books, Torah, Quran, and Gospels and read at least 5 minutes a day of your Holy Books to start! Give Creators of Earth 5 minute of your time, however this is the least we can do when Creators of Earth gave us the Holy Breath of life within our lungs.
    Torah, Qur’an and Gospels are your soul and your return back to Heaven.

  15. Tom says:

    cell phones and the internet are driving people apart…so many people think they have hundreds of close friends, just because it is easy to contact them electronically…so many people send email, instead of talking…almost no one writes to anyone anymore…facebook, twitter, etc are not conducive to people becoming closer…they are just illusions

  16. Dr. Robert says:

    I am one of the few who do not use Facebook, Twitter or other quick social media. If you need to reach me you can call and leave a message, text me, or you can email me. With each way I will respond.

  17. Chester says:

    Some people just don’t like interacting with others. Never have. People have always been distracted. Books, magazines, newspapers,

    Email a letter is the same as writing one. Except it gets there sooner, no risk of it falling off the truck, no stamp to pay for.

  18. Rev. Bill says:

    It is not my job to judge those who live a more “modern” lifestyle. Many folks now days actually have an e-book bible on their phone. As for lgbt & whatever else is coming, let God be the ultimate judge, as we are all God’s children. My personal opinion is old school, however life is about choices. If you have a differing choice from me, please do not try to dramatize it in my presence.

  19. James J. K. Harrill says:

    My son who is a Professional Photographer in Atlanta, the only reason I mention the fact of his vocation is to reference photography is highly Tec-Driven… Yet my son recently made mention that TEXTING today is merely one tec-note up the chart above where the Telegraph of the 1800’s would be found. My take on the totality of the consumption of our cell phones today is depriving us of the visual, the personal awareness of the who, what and where of the World around us. The clerk in the Convenient Store who lays down their cell phone to ring up my purchase, yet will look down at it several times before my transaction is finished thus removing any true awareness of Who the person they just did a business transaction was, What they looked like, or if they seemed okay with the service. Cell phones have taken away the presence of mind… In present time for far too many!

  20. bud seel says:

    I don’t understand I guess. But, you would think that religious freedom and LGBTQ right’s would be one in the same. Aren’t they both fighting for freedom? Why is it so hard for people to not judge one another? Why can’t people love and forget to hate?

  21. Kingsley chimtuwa luke says:

    It’s good to have Bible or gospel messages in our phone, but that shouldn’t make it to be primarily good for we to use our phones as Bible our in the church, I believe that our hand book Bible was given to us as an witness to show yes really we believe and pridely we are the believers of the word there in, but today we are shown casing our good phones in the church instead of the Bible we claimed to be ours, but I believe we all know the truth to fellow thanks

  22. Lyn Anton says:

    I don’t see the addiction to phones as any more threatening than when computers generated as much “over interest.” This too shall pass and in the meantime, self absorption is worse than phone obsession. And one can get in touch with religious sites as well as tweets, IM, and other facets. One of the things that is also true is that there are many who cannot afford a smart phone. When everyone can get one, interest will decline. Again, like PCs.

  23. Rev. John Preshur says:

    Sometimes its the only way to keep in touch with brother s and sisters in Christ , but they should not be on if you our in church

  24. Olga says:

    I believe people have forgotten how to communicate with one another since cell phones hit the market.
    you see it everywhere. In resterants whole families sit together and each on there cell phone. mom at bus stop with two kids on her cell phone. kids neglected.where is the verbal conversation with friends and loved ones.

  25. I.S. Johnson says:

    The danger is not “sin” or “Worship” of an electronic device. The danger, which is absolutely real and already causing damage to our society, is many fold. I will address the top three. 1.Dependence: people are becoming dependent on a device for the ability to find employment, directions, communication with friends and family and a myriad of other needs. This is fundamentally changing how our entire society functions and is creating a new form of discrimination that is rapidly becoming toxic to our society. Those who do not wish to use this technology are being cut out of employment opportunities, promotions, and the ability to provide for their families at a basic level. There is no freedom to choose. You either conform or perish. Conform or die is not a real choice it is coercion by need to live. Vast amounts of resources are being channeled away from conventional investment and into cyber tech. Cyber tech produces no tangible goods it is nearly totally service oriented. That means those with vast wealth economically enslave the those without as all employment becomes service to those who can afford to consume. 2. Losing Basic Skills: By allowing a device to do the thinking for us we forget how to do basic skills ourselves. Reading a map, basic grammar, how to write (Long Hand is not even taught in many schools today) and social mores. All these new devices require power to operate. During Hurricane Sandy people became helpless when the power went out. CAN YOU SAY NATIONAL SECURITY ISSUE? As we rely on electronic devices more and more we weaken the basic social fabric of our society that is strengthened by direct personal interaction with other human beings. A culture thinned becomes a culture lost. THIRD: Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure (EMRE) and its long term effects on health! There is no universally accepted study showing that EMRE has detrimental effects on human health, Correct. Why is this, because the only agency that could do such a study is operated by the industry making Billions on Cell Phones and WiFi and they refuse to do such a study to make sure there is no accepted proof that the virtual EMRE soup we all now live in is killing us on a cellular level. The GOD Humanity prays to is not a device it is Greed, Sloth, Hate, Gluttony, Indifference to your fellow man, Hubris and Apathy. We are experiencing the rewards of this worship of the flesh all around the world each minute of each day and every one of us is responsible to some extent, even me. There is little “SMART” about channeling our entire lives through a single medium thus allowing a tiny number of corporations to gather vast amounts of information about our lives, habits and daily comings and goings. Think what the tyrants of history would do with such power. Then wonder what the invisible tyrants of today are already doing with it. If you are lead by the nose by your vices, are you really free? Put that in your APP and SWIPE IT.

    1. HSW says:

      Let’s ignore the vast conspiracy of the health issues – those who choose can deal with that as they will.

      The devices that take power to operate started with lights, and now extend to every part of our lives. This isn’t new – if you want to bitch about changing society with technology you probably should dig up Henry Ford and Thomas Edison and start there. Maybe you’d like to include the Wright Brothers.

      Society changes and evolves. The nature of work and available work changes and evolves. That’s been happening long before most people ever dreamed of the devices we now know and use so heavily.

      Rely on them to find employment? Yep – and they allow us to find employment in places we can’t just walk over and put in an application to – places across the country where we’d like to live, rather than where we’re stuck living, because that’s where we happened to be born.

      There’s still plenty of up close and personal social interaction for those who want it – those who don’t actually fare better for being allowed to connect with people by a means they find more comfortable. Years ago, when someone changed jobs, they often lost touch with the people they had worked with for years, because you can only physically interact so much and still work, have family time, and do the other things life requires. Now I have a number of friends from jobs I worked 30 years ago, because technology has allowed us to keep in touch and follow each others’ lives, even though actually getting together doesn’t happen often.

      For every evil, if one chooses, they can find good. It’s how you use it that matters, not the fact of its existence or the fact that it’s changed society. So did railroads. So did electricity. So did giving women the right to vote and have a voice in society. The world changes. We change. That’s not by definition a bad thing – it’s called progress.

      1. I.S. Johnson says:

        All the things you say are better were just as achievable with the technology already at hand. I am not against progress. I am for reasoned progress. Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell and we know where that leads. Cell technology has not been widely used for thirty years. In 1986 few people had cell phones. Is it cell tech that keeps you in touch or Face Book that has allowed your communication? If you think that the dangers of EMRE are a “conspiracy” you are woefully uninformed. I am not a Luddite. I just do not want to fall victim to the laziness of the few. Electricity was first used in the U.S. in the 1880’s and did not reach most of rural America until the 1950’S. (slow change) A cyber attack that wipes out our electrical grid is a primary threat to our nation ask the pentagon. Just because we use it does not mean it is good for us. Case in point cigarettes, DDT, Lead paint, Lead pipes, various prescription drugs, all were once used widely and now are restricted or banned. Progress goes both ways with increased knowledge. Cars were a city item until the Forties but were for sale in 1894. (gradual change) Those inventions helped the majority of society and harmed a great number as well ask the Indians and the Chinese. Cell phones have created far more negative effects than the good they do. You are entitled to you view. All of the effects I mentioned above relate to spiritual degradation as well. We are one, what we do to the world and all those in it either brings us closer to the creator or farther from the creator. The abuse I inflict on others for my own personal gain I inflict on myself. Ever thought of that. Where are your precious phones made? How are the people who make them treated? Where are the materials mined? How are the miners treated? What damage does the industry cause to our world so you can e-mail a friend about the big game or a picture of your dinner?

        1. Brother John says:

          Your comment about the relatively recent widespread availability of seemingly endless electricity struck a chord, I.S. Here’s a link to a blog entry I made about our vastly underrated reliance on electricity, which involves far more than cell phones.

          https://vijohn.wordpress.com/2014/05/

  26. HSW says:

    It’s people like you who do the most harm to social discourse. Having a conversation with someone who calls those who don’t share their views “woefully uninformed” creates such a sense of dis-ease as to bring people do do what I’m about to do – back out of the conversation. Or rather monologue, as we are not truly having a conversation – that would suggest some attempt at a meeting of the minds, and yours is clearly closed.

    “You are entitled to you view.” Apparently not, as I am woefully uninformed.

    “The abuse I inflict on others for my own personal gain I inflict on myself. Ever thought of that.” Why yes, yes I have. Have you? See what I did there…a question mark at the end of a question.

    Big game? Picture of my dinner? Dude you don’t know me. I neither follow sports nor take photos of my food for social media, but even if I did, what business would that be of yours?

    Have a nice, judgmental, secure-in-the-incorrect-belief-that-you’re-the-smartest-guy-in-the-room life.

  27. I.S. Johnson says:

    Okay, Dude.

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